• 001 - the logo.jpg
  • 002 - Hiroshima sunset.jpg
  • 003 - Auschwitz-Birkenau ramp.jpg
  • 004 - Chernobyl contamination.jpg
  • 005 - Darvaza flaming gas crater.jpg
  • 006 - Berlin Wall madness.jpg
  • 007 - Bulgaria - monument at the bottom of Buzludzhy park hill.jpg
  • 008 - Ijen crater.jpg
  • 009 - Aralsk, Kazakhstan.jpg
  • 010 - Paris catacombs.jpg
  • 011 - Krakatoa.jpg
  • 012 - Ho Chi Minh mausoleum, Hanoi.jpg
  • 013 - Uyuni.jpg
  • 014 - DMZ Vietnam.jpg
  • 015 - Colditz Kopie.jpg
  • 016 - Glasgow Necropolis.jpg
  • 017 - Ani.jpg
  • 018 - Kamikaze.jpg
  • 019 - Arlington.jpg
  • 020 - Karosta prison.jpg
  • 021 - Kazakhstan.jpg
  • 022 - Chacabuco ghost town.jpg
  • 023 - Eagle's Nest, Obersalzberg, Berchtesgaden.jpg
  • 024 - Kursk.jpg
  • 025 - Bran castle, Carpathia, Romania.jpg
  • 026 - Bestattungsmuseum Wien.jpg
  • 027 - Pripyat near Chernobyl.jpg
  • 028 - Sedlec ossuary, Czech Republic.jpg
  • 029 - Pyramida Lenin.jpg
  • 030 - Falklands.jpg
  • 031 - Majdanek.jpg
  • 032 - Soufriere volcano, Montserrat.jpg
  • 033 - moai on Easter Island.jpg
  • 034 - Sigoarjo.jpg
  • 035 - Hötensleben.jpg
  • 036 - Natzweiler.jpg
  • 037 - Polygon, Semipalatinsk test site, Kazakhstan.jpg
  • 038 - Srebrenica.jpg
  • 039 - Liepaja, Latvia.jpg
  • 040 - Vemork hydroelectric power plant building, Norway.jpg
  • 041 - Enola Gay.jpg
  • 042 - Pentagon 9-11 memorial.jpg
  • 043 - Robben Island prison, South Africa.jpg
  • 044 - Tollund man.jpg
  • 045 - Marienthal tunnel.jpg
  • 046 - Aso, Japan.jpg
  • 047 - Labrador battery Singapore.jpg
  • 048 - Artyom island, Absheron, Azerbaijan.jpg
  • 049 - Treblinka.jpg
  • 050 - Titan II silo.jpg
  • 051 - dosemetering doll, Chernobyl.jpg
  • 052 - Holocaust memorial, Berlin.jpg
  • 053 - Komodo dragon.jpg
  • 054 - cemeterio general, Santiago de Chile.jpg
  • 055 - Tuol Sleng, Phnom Phen, Cambodia.jpg
  • 056 - West Virginia penitentiary.jpg
  • 057 - ovens, Dachau.jpg
  • 058 - Derry, Northern Ireland.jpg
  • 059 - Bulgaria - Buzludzha - workers of all countries unite.jpg
  • 060 - Sachsenhausen.jpg
  • 061 - Tiraspol dom sovietov.jpg
  • 062 - modern-day Pompeii - Plymouth, Montserrat.jpg
  • 063 - Pico de Fogo.jpg
  • 064 - Trinity Day.jpg
  • 065 - Zwentendorf control room.jpg
  • 066 - Wolfschanze.jpg
  • 067 - Hiroshima by night.jpg
  • 068 - mass games, North Korea.jpg
  • 069 - Harrisburg.jpg
  • 070 - Nuremberg.jpg
  • 071 - Mostar.jpg
  • 072 - Tu-22, Riga aviation museum.jpg
  • 073 - Gallipoli, Lone Pine.jpg
  • 074 - Auschwitz-Birkenau - fence.jpg
  • 075 - Darvaza flaming gas crater.jpg
  • 076 - Atatürk Mausoleum, Ankara.jpg
  • 077 - Banda Aceh boats.jpg
  • 078 - AMARG.jpg
  • 079 - Chacabuco ruins.jpg
  • 080 - Bucharest.jpg
  • 081 - Bernauer Straße.jpg
  • 082 - Death Railway, Thailand.jpg
  • 083 - Mandor killing fields.jpg
  • 084 - Kozloduy.jpg
  • 085 - Jerusalem.jpg
  • 086 - Latin Bridge, Sarajevo.jpg
  • 087 - Panmunjom, DMZ, Korea.jpg
  • 088 - Ijen blue flames.jpg
  • 089 - Derry reconsilliation monument.jpg
  • 090 - Ebensee.jpg
  • 091 - Mödlareuth barbed wire.jpg
  • 092 - skull heaps in Sedlec ossuary, Czech Republic.jpg
  • 093 - Nikel.jpg
  • 094 - Vught.jpg
  • 095 - Tital launch control centre.jpg
  • 096 - Dallas Dealy Plaza and Sixth Floor Museum.jpg
  • 097 - Auschwitz I.jpg
  • 098 - Stalin and Lenion, Tirana, Albania.jpg
  • 099 - Podgorica, Montenegro, small arms and light weapons sculpture.jpg
  • 100 - Peenemünde.jpg
  • 101 - Tarrafal.jpg
  • 102 - Kilmainham prison, Dublin.jpg
  • 103 - North Korea.jpg
  • 104 - Mittelbau-Dora.jpg
  • 105 - Chacabuca big sky.jpg
  • 106 - Stutthof, Poland.jpg
  • 107 - Merapi destruction.jpg
  • 108 - Chueung Ek killing fields, Cambodia.jpg
  • 109 - Marienborn former GDR border.jpg
  • 110 - Mig and star, Kazakhstan.jpg
  • 111 - Japanese cave East Timor.jpg
  • 112 - Hellfire Pass, Thailand.jpg
  • 113 - Kiev.jpg
  • 114 - Grutas Park, Lithuania.jpg
  • 115 - Zwentendorf reactor core.jpg
  • 116 - two occupations, Tallinn.jpg
  • 117 - Trunyan burial site.jpg
  • 118 - Ushuaia prison.jpg
  • 119 - Buchenwald.jpg
  • 120 - Marienthal with ghost.jpg
  • 121 - Murmansk harbour - with an aircraft carrier.jpg
  • 122 - Berlin Olympiastadion.JPG
  • 123 - Bastille Day, Paris.jpg
  • 124 - Spassk.jpg
  • 125 - Theresienstadt.jpg
  • 126 - B-52s.jpg
  • 127 - Bledug Kuwu.jpg
  • 128 - Friedhof der Namenlosen, Vienna.jpg
  • 129 - Auschwitz-Birkenau barracks.jpg
  • 130 - mummies, Bolivia.jpg
  • 131 - Barringer meteor crater.jpg
  • 132 - Murambi, Rwanda.jpg
  • 133 - NTS.jpg
  • 134 - Mauthausen Soviet monument.jpg
  • 135 - pullution, Kazakhstan.JPG
  • 136 - palm oil madness.jpg
  • 137 - Berlin socialist realism.jpg
  • 138 - Indonesia wildfire.jpg
  • 139 - Pawiak, Warsaw.jpg
  • 140 - flying death, military museum Dresden.JPG
  • 141 - KGB gear.JPG
  • 142 - KZ jacket.JPG
  • 143 - ex-USSR.JPG
  • 144 - Indonesia fruit bats.JPG
  • 145 - Alcatraz.JPG
  • 146 - Chernobyl Museum, Kiev, Ukraine.JPG
  • 147 - Halemaumau lava lake glow, Hawaii.JPG
  • 148 - Rosinenbomber at Tempelhof, Berlin.jpg
  • 149 - Verdun, France.JPG
  • 150 - hospital, Vukovar, Croatia.JPG
  • 151 - the original tomb of Napoleon, St Helena.JPG
  • 152 - Buchenwald, Germany.JPG
  • 153 - Bhopal.JPG
  • 154 - Groß-Rosen, Poland.jpg
  • 155 - at Monino, Russia.jpg
  • 156 - blinking Komodo.jpg
  • 157 - inside Chernobyl NPP.JPG
  • 158 - Mount St Helens, USA.JPG
  • 159 - Maly Trostenec, Minsk, Belarus.jpg
  • 160 - Vucedol skulls, Croatia.JPG
  • 161 - colourful WW1 shells.JPG
  • 162 - Zeljava airbase in Croatia.JPG
  • 163 - rusting wrecks, Chernobyl.JPG
  • 164 - San Bernadine alle Ossa, Milan, Italy.jpg
  • 165 - USS Arizona Memorial, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.JPG
  • 166 - Brest Fortress, Belarus.JPG
  • 167 - thousands of bats, Dom Rep.JPG
  • 168 - Hohenschönhausen, Berlin.JPG
  • 169 - Perm-36 gulag site.JPG
  • 170 - Jasenovac, Croatia.JPG
  • 171 - Beelitz Heilstätten.JPG
  • 172 - Kremlin, Moscow.jpg
  • 173 - old arms factory, Dubnica.JPG
  • 174 - Pervomaisc ICBM base, more  missiles, including an SS-18 Satan.jpg
  • 175 - Cellular Jail, Port Blair.jpg
  • 176 - Bunker Valentin, Germany.JPG
  • 177 - control room, Chernobyl NPP.JPG
  • 178 - Lest we Forget, Ypres.JPG
  • 179 - the logo again.jpg

Camp Kigali Belgian Memorial

  
  - darkometer rating: 5 -
 
The site in Rwanda's capital city Kigali where ten Belgian UN peacekeepers were murdered by the Hutu extremists in order to provoke a withdrawal of the UN forces, which then cleared the way for the full scale of the Rwandan genocide to unfold. 

>More background info

>What there is to see

>Location

>Access and costs

>Time required

>Combinations with other dark destinations

>Combinations with non-dark destinations

>Photos  

    

More background info: When the UN mission for Rwanda (UNAMIR) was set up in 1993, the only first-world nation willing to provide professionally equipped soldiers for the peacekeeping effort was Belgium, of all countries. This was unfortunate in so far as Belgium was also the former colonial power in Rwanda, until independence was granted in 1962. Normally the UN avoids having personnel from former colonial countries involved in the relevant countries, in this case there wasn't much choice, given the reluctance of all other developed nations to take part. The rest of the mission personnel was eventually comprised of Ghanaians, Tunisians, Bangladeshis and other nationals from developing countries.
 
Obviously, Belgian soldiers present in Rwanda posed a certain risk for the overall atmosphere, and also for the Belgian troops themselves, since they could potentially be targets of aggression.
 
But what happened on the first day after the genocide broke out, on 7 April 1994, was, however, not so much rampaging mob aggression, but rather a very carefully calculated assassination for a very specific purpose.
 
And there had been a warning. An informer, the ominous "Jean Pierre" (the code name used by the UN), confided, amongst other things, that there was a plan on the part of the Hutu extremists to take out some ten Belgian soldiers with the clear aim of destabilizing the UN mission. The calculation was that if Belgium suffered casualties in its former colony, it would withdraw from UNAMIR – and if that happened the whole mission might collapse. In any case it would open up a way for the full-scale genocide to commence. The background to this calculation was the case of Somalia, where US soldiers had been killed and their bodies publicly dragged through the streets, which then was the trigger for the US to pull out. For the Rwandan extremists it was an instructive lesson they learned only too well, and which they consciously sought to apply to their own case. As the Canadian commander of UNAMIR, General Romeo Dallaire, later remarked: "they knew us better than we knew ourselves" …
 
The plan did indeed work. Shortly after the calculated murder of the ten Belgian soldiers, the rest of their troops were in fact pulled out – while at the same time all the Western nations evacuated their expatriate residents from Rwanda, together with a sizeable proportion of the UN mission staff too.
 
In short: the "international community" decided to leave Rwanda to it, i.e. abandon it to the genocidaires who now had virtually free rein. Ten Belgian soldiers' lives lost was all it took to make the world run with its tail between its legs and then stand by while nearly a million Rwandans were systematically slaughtered.
 
Despite that huge difference in numbers it is of course never really morally right to weigh a certain number of dead up against another (or is it? – it's one of the persistent dilemmas in a context such as this and I have no sure answer). The tragedy of the deaths of those ten Belgian soldiers should certainly not be belittled here.
 
Their deaths were indeed brutal and despicable too. Apparently they were first taunted, intimidated and beaten, before being executed. Some were killed right away, the rest made a stand and held out in a three-hour siege in one of the buildings at the Rwandan army barracks they had been taken to, but were finally overpowered and killed by grenades and machine-gun fire. The mutilated bodies of the Belgian paratroopers were then dumped in a pile at the morgue of a nearby hospital – a further shock for the UN staff and their commander when they finally reached their men.
 
It remains a bone of contention whether these casualties could have been avoided – but UN commander Dallaire holds that since the killings took place within the Rwandan army barracks, he wouldn't have had the military means to take on the army by force at their base – and had he done so, the UN would have become a combatant party in the conflict and thus a legitimate target for more and wider-ranging attacks. Far more casualties could have been the result – and it would have meant the definite end of the peacekeeping mission.
 
Whatever the military and/or diplomatic arguments, what became clear was, that the Hutu extremists' plot to sabotage international support for the UN mission had worked like a treat.
 
The memorial site, set up by the Belgians on 7 April 2000, is thus a doubly dark spot: not just as a commemorative place for the ten dead men, but also a place to mourn the shamefully reflexive reaction by the "international community" – to run away and leave Rwanda in the lurch.  
 
 
What there is to see: The complex, which used to be part of an army base, is accessed through a gate, with an old barrier boom now permanently swung 90 degrees out of the way. Beyond is a cluster of single-storey buildings and to the right a small memorial garden.
 
This is the centre point of the actual memorial and features ten dark grey granite columns, one for each of the soldiers killed. A number of notches on the side indicates how old the respective soldiers were at the time of their death ... most were in their twenties. Their initials are chiselled at the bottom, so you can match them against the memorial plaques on a nearby wall that lists their full names.
 
The rest of the wall of the same building is the starkest element of the site: it is pockmarked with shell and bullet holes. Inside, there's another plaque with names, flanked by a Belgian and a Rwandan flag, next to a corner of the room where more shell/bullet scars on the wall and patches of a darker coloration indicate the place where some of the soldiers met their deaths.
 
There are two more rooms accessible, and a number of trilingual (French, Dutch, English) panels have been set up, giving a rough overview of various genocides world history has seen (though not all of the episodes listed here are universally classed as actual genocide), as well as some basic information.
 
On one wall there is a blackboard area, now under glass, on which scribbles and drawings hurl taunting abuse at the UN and UNAMIR's then commander General Romeo Dallaire, under whose command these casualties occurred. These expressions of disapproval with the otherwise widely accepted view of Dallaire as a courageous "hero" are quite a stunning thing to behold. The site was set up and is maintained by the Belgian government. Could it be that it too still feels it has axes to grind? Even though Dallaire was officially cleared of all accusations of neglect or misconduct. Some kind of explanatory text accompaniment would have been in place here. As it is, the visitor is left puzzling for themselves over this blackboard element of the memorial.
 
Overall, small-scale as it may be, it is still an important site – both regarding the historical significance and in terms of its rawness and rough edges. A place of only a few deaths – in contrast to the often overwhelmingly amassed human remains in some of the other genocide-related memorial sites in Rwanda – but still leaving quite an impact. One of the must-see sites for the dark tourist in Kigali.
 
 
Location: just south of the centre of Kigali, about a mile from the large roundabout at the northern entrance to the city centre, three quarters of a mile from the Hotel des Mille Collines, and only steps from the Serena Hotel (formerly Diplomates, the InterContinental), at the end of Avenue de l'Armee, where it curves 90 degrees to intersect with Boulevard de la Revolution.
 
Google maps locator: [-1.958,30.063]
 
 
Access and costs: quite easy, free.
 
Details: given the central location it's quite easy to get to the site – if you are staying within the city centre you could even walk it, otherwise it's a short taxi/scooter ride.
 
I visited the place as part of a guided tour with a driver/guide; and when we got there, everything was freely accessible at no extra cost. There was nobody else about, no guard, no local guide, no one to charge any money or open or lock any doors. I can't say what the opening times of the indoor parts of the site may be (I presume they will be locked overnight), but it can be assumed that any normal working day during normal business hours should be fine.
 
 
Time required: between 10 and 20 minutes should do for most visitors.
 
 
Combinations with other dark destinations: obviously, the Kigali Genocide Memorial Centre in Gisozi is a must – the main such site in Rwanda, and also one that tries to strike a more even balance and place events in a wider context. See under Kigali for more secondary dark sites within the city limits.
 
 
Combinations with non-dark destinations: the site is near the centre of Kigali, so look under that city's entry for more general info.
    
 
 
  • Camp Kigali Belgian Memorial 01Camp Kigali Belgian Memorial 01
  • Camp Kigali Belgian Memorial 02Camp Kigali Belgian Memorial 02
  • Camp Kigali Belgian Memorial 03Camp Kigali Belgian Memorial 03
  • Camp Kigali Belgian Memorial 04Camp Kigali Belgian Memorial 04
  • Camp Kigali Belgian Memorial 05Camp Kigali Belgian Memorial 05
  • Camp Kigali Belgian Memorial 06Camp Kigali Belgian Memorial 06
  • Camp Kigali Belgian Memorial 07Camp Kigali Belgian Memorial 07
  • Camp Kigali Belgian Memorial 08Camp Kigali Belgian Memorial 08
  • Camp Kigali Belgian Memorial 09Camp Kigali Belgian Memorial 09
  • Camp Kigali Belgian Memorial 10Camp Kigali Belgian Memorial 10
  • Camp Kigali Belgian Memorial 11Camp Kigali Belgian Memorial 11
  • Camp Kigali Belgian Memorial 12Camp Kigali Belgian Memorial 12
  • Camp Kigali Belgian Memorial 13Camp Kigali Belgian Memorial 13
  • Camp Kigali Belgian Memorial 14Camp Kigali Belgian Memorial 14
  • Camp Kigali Belgian Memorial 15Camp Kigali Belgian Memorial 15
     
  
  
  
  
  
  

© dark-tourism.com, Peter Hohenhaus 2010-2019

Cookies make it easier for us to provide you with our services. With the usage of our services you permit us to use cookies.
More information Ok